Rug and Textile Appreciation Morning: Textiles in Burman Culture

Researcher Sylvia Fraser-Lu discusses her new book on the evolution of Burmese textiles, including examples of the country’s most iconic pieces, as well as lesser known textiles from the remote areas of the Burman heartland. About the Book Sylvia Fraser-Lu’s…

Rug and Textile Appreciation Morning: Textiles in Burman Culture

Source

0
(0)

Researcher Sylvia Fraser-Lu discusses her new book on the evolution of Burmese textiles, including examples of the country’s most iconic pieces, as well as lesser known textiles from the remote areas of the Burman heartland.

About the Book
Sylvia Fraser-Lu’s new book, “Textiles in Burman Culture,” gives an overview of the history and evolution of textiles made and used by the Burman (Bama) people. This ethnic majority group comprises approximately 70 percent of the present-day population of Burma (Myanmar). The book describes and illustrates textiles made for royalty, religious leaders, and commoners — with information on fibers, dyes and weaving techniques. Fraser-Lu also explores the importance of cloth in the life cycle, literature and in trade relations with neighboring states.

Colorful photographs feature some of Burma’s most iconic textiles: wave-patterned tapestry-weave (lun-taya acheik), embroidered wall hangings (kalaga), and intricately patterned Buddhist manuscript binding ribbons (sa-zi-gyo) made on a card loom. In addition to visiting the major textile centers, Fraser-Lu also ventured into the more remote areas of the Burman heartland to find new information on important lesser known textiles from Rakhine, Yaw, Shwebo, Pyay and Shan State that have been made for sale in the Burman market.

About Rug and Textile Appreciation Mornings
Collectors and experts discuss textile topics and display examples from their personal holdings. You are invited to submit related pieces to share during the program. This series is named in honor of late Textile Museum trustee emeritus, Harold M. Keshishian.

The views and opinions expressed by program speakers do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, or its partners.

0 / 5. 0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *